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Chrysaora quinquecirrha   (Desor, 1848)

sea nettle

Native range | All suitable habitat | Point map | Year 2100
This map was computer-generated and has not yet been reviewed.
Chrysaora quinquecirrha  AquaMaps  Data sources: GBIF OBIS
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Classification / Names Common names | Synonyms | CoL | ITIS | WoRMS

Scyphozoa | Semaeostomeae | Pelagiidae

Environment: milieu / climate zone / depth range / distribution range Ecology

Pelagic; depth range 0 - 85 m (Ref. 116114).  Temperate

Distribution Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans.

Length at first maturity / Size / Weight / Age

Maturity: Lm ?  range ? - ? cm Max length : 25.0 cm WD male/unsexed; (Ref. 2992)

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Neritic, estuarine (Ref. 116114). Euryhaline medusae occurring in mixohaline and euhaline waters (3 to 5 parts per thousand). Feeds on polychaetes and comb jellies. Preyed upon by spider crabs, harvest fish and orange filefish. Acts as shelter for young harvest fish (Peprilus elepidotus). Venomous. Associated with Libinia dubia (Ref. 3095). Undergoes metagenesis, alternation between polyp and medusa generation. Sessile polyps reproduce asexually (i.e. podocyst formation). During spring and summer, undergoes strobilation to give rise to ephyrae, which rapidly grows into dioecious medusae. Hermaphroditism is known but rare. Eggs are shed into gastrovascular cavity. Fertilization takes place either in the cavity or externally and produces free-swimming planula larvae, which settles on firm substrate and eventually develop in polyps (Ref. 3065). Medusae reach maturity in late June or July. Spawning eventually takes place until September with peak months, July and August (Ref. 3065).

Life cycle and mating behavior Maturity | Reproduction | Spawning | Eggs | Fecundity | Larvae

Undergoes metagenesis, alternation between polyp and medusa generation. Sessile polyps reproduce asexually (i.e. podocyst formation). During spring and summer, undergoes strobilation to give rise to ephyrae, which rapidly grows into dioecious medusae. Hermaphroditism is known but rare. Eggs are shed into gastrovascular cavity. Fertilization takes place either in the cavity or externally and produces free-swimming planula larvae, which settles on firm substrate and eventually develop in polyps.

Main reference References | Coordinator | Collaborators

Calder, D.R. 1972. (Ref. 3065)

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 120744)


CITES status (Ref. 108899)

Not Evaluated

CMS (Ref. 116361)

Not Evaluated

Threat to humans

  Venomous (Ref. 3065)

Human uses


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More information

Countries
FAO areas
Ecosystems
Occurrences
Introductions
Stocks
Ecology
Diet
Food items
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Morphology
Larvae
Abundance
References
Mass conversion

Internet sources

BHL | BOLD Systems | CISTI | DiscoverLife | FAO(Publication : search) | GenBank (genome, nucleotide) | GloBI | | Google Books | Google Scholar | Google | ispecies | PubMed | Tree of Life | Wikipedia (Go, Search) | Zoological Record

Estimates of some properties based on models

Vulnerability (Ref. 71543)
Low vulnerability (15 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown