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Dinurus tornatus   (Rudolphi)

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Dinurus tornatus
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drawing shows typical species in this Family.

Classification / Names Common names | Synonyms | CoL | ITIS | WoRMS

Trematoda | Azygiida | Hemiuridae

Environment: milieu / climate zone / depth range / distribution range Ecology

Pelagic.  Tropical

Distribution Countries | FAO areas | Ecosystems | Occurrences | Introductions

Western Atlantic and Indo-Pacific.

Length at first maturity / Size / Weight / Age

Maturity: Lm ?  range ? - ? cm Max length : 0.2 cm TL male/unsexed; (Ref. 359)

Short description Morphology

Highly variable; minuscule to large, elongate fluke with the oral and ventral suckers close together. Oral sucker: Less than 1/2 to 2/3 the diameter of the ventral sucker. Tail: More than 1/3 to more than 1/2 of the total body length. Deep striations (cuticular denticulations): occur on the sides of body. The egg filled uterus extends into the tail and often 1/2 way down the tail. The intestinal ceca extend to the end of the tail. The winding vitellaria extend from the posterior body into the tail (Ref. 359).

Biology     Glossary (e.g. epibenthic)

Length: 0.02 to 0.225 cm (Ref. 359). The superinfections we found in the Caribbean have not been recorded elsewhere. Possibly, infections are more severe and damaging to dolphin in the Caribbean than in the Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic coasts of North and South America. A very heavy infection of 250 flukes was reported in a dolphin from India. Associations: found 5 to 2805 worms in 13 dolphin from off La Parguera. Hundreds of other parasites occurred with this parasite, but none showed any correlation with the numbers of this worm. Host Specificity: a characteristic parasite of dolphin and probably pompano dolphin. It appears to prefer dolphins to scombrids by having higher numbers and occurring in greater frequency. Some records from scombrids may represent false hosts from dolphin prey and/or misidentifications of D. euthynniYamaguti or D. scombri. New host: Bar Jack. Damage to Host: Superinfections of this worm must damage and limit the growth of this commercially and recreationally valuable fish. Encysted metacercariae cause "black-spot disease" in herrings from Argentina (Ref. 359). Members of the class Trematoda are parasitic, thus requires a host to survive. Life cycle: Eggs are passed on to the feces of the hosts. Embryos hatch into miracidia and penetrate the tissues of snails where they further undergo three stages: sporocysts (Ref. 833).

Life cycle and mating behavior Maturity | Reproduction | Spawning | Eggs | Fecundity | Larvae

Members of the class Trematoda are parasitic, thus requires a host to survive. Life cycle: Eggs are passed on to the feces of the hosts. Embryos hatch into miracidia and penetrate the tissues of snails where they further undergo three stages: sporocysts

Main reference References | Coordinator | Collaborators

Williams, E.H. Jr. and L. Bunkley-Williams. 1996. (Ref. 359)

IUCN Red List Status (Ref. 115185)

CITES status (Ref. 108899)

Not Evaluated

CMS (Ref. 116361)

Not Evaluated

Threat to humans

Human uses


| FishSource |

More information

Countries
FAO areas
Ecosystems
Occurrences
Introductions
Stocks
Ecology
Diet
Food items
Common names
Synonyms
Predators
Reproduction
Maturity
Spawning
Fecundity
Eggs
Egg development
Age/Size
Growth
Length-weight
Length-length
Morphology
Larvae
Abundance
References
Mass conversion

Internet sources

BHL | BOLD Systems | CISTI | DiscoverLife | FAO(Publication : search) | GenBank (genome, nucleotide) | GloBI | | Google Books | Google Scholar | Google | ispecies | PubMed | Tree of Life | Wikipedia (Go, Search) | Zoological Record

Estimates of some properties based on models

Vulnerability (Ref. 71543)
Low vulnerability (10 of 100)
Price category (Ref. 80766)
Unknown